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Estate Planning Archives

An executor of a will must navigate many responsibilities

If you have been named the executor of a loved one's last will and testament, it is important for you to fully understand your responsibilities. In general, you are tasked with managing your loved one's final financial obligations. However, even one misstep can leave you liable.

What elder law can do for seniors

Aging comes with no shortage of questions. Whether you are an adult thinking about your parent or are starting to think about yourself as you get on in years, you no doubt have concerns about money, medical issues and the possibility of assisted living or other types of care.

What quick succession in death has to do with estate planning

When former President George H.W. Bush, a Massachusetts native, passed away in November, he joined his beloved wife, Barbara, who died in April. It isn't uncommon to see couples who have been married a long time – the Bushes were wed for 73 years – pass away in quick succession.

Life insurance shouldn't be overlooked in estate planning

We all think of life insurance as a way to provide cash to our loved ones upon our unexpected deaths. But life insurance is more than that. It's actually can be a key part of an estate planning portfolio for many Massachusetts residents.

Why you need a health care proxy and how to pick your agent

A health care proxy is a legal document that allows you to choose an alternate decision maker for your health care in case you become unable to make your own medical decisions. Regardless of where you live in the country, having a health care proxy keeps you in control of your medical decisions by making your wishes known to the doctors through your alternate decision maker, called a health care agent. It is especially important in Massachusetts to have this set up because medical instructions left in a living will may not be legally recognized.

How to pay for long-term care without liquidating all your assets

If you have created estate plans, you may feel like you are ahead of the game. Planning how your affairs are managed after you are gone is important, but you also need to think about what may happen as you age. According to the AARP, after people turn 65, there is a 50-50 chance they will require long-term care. Paying for long-term care is not inexpensive. The average cost of long-term care in the U.S. is $85,800 a year, but in some states, the costs are much higher.

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Casey & Lundregan, P.C.
71 Washington Street
Salem, MA 01970

Phone: 978-224-8893
Toll Free: 800-785-3588
Fax: 978-745-3607
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